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For the best Caribbean sandwiches in Seattle, eat at Bongos

Adiós Paseo’s, Bongos Caribbean Cafe has a sandwich worthy of a cult following

Bongos offers sandwiches and Caribbean plates that are hefty and tangy. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Bongos offers sandwiches and Caribbean plates that are hefty and tangy. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Enough whining about Paseo’s. For me, Paseo’s was never a religious experience like so many others claimed when the doors abruptly closed. It’s time for you to move on to my favorite Hot Spot, a hidden spot that offers Caribbean sandwiches and plates that I think are BETTER than Paseo’s. Yes, I said it.

My critique of Paseo’s is that its sandwiches were too wet and messy, with the ingredients often sliding out of the bun and landing on the saturated paper before you caught them in your mouth. The problem – you couldn’t enjoy the combination of flavors with each bite. It just wasn’t worth the long wait that took up half of your lunch hour before you’d even placed an order. The media craze when Paseo’s closed was over the top with television coverage, numerous newspaper stories and blogs describing eaters coveted the restaurant and mourning its closure.

Even before Paseo’s closed in Fremont and Ballard neighborhoods about a month ago, I had found my favorite hot spot this summer called Bongos, at 6501 Aurora Ave. N., Seattle.

Bongos is a causal joint full of character and color. The restaurant is actually a food truck connected to a building right off Aurora Avenue, across from Green Lake. Step inside for a sandwich and be surrounded by bright colors or sit outside on patio chairs in the sand once summer returns.

I ordered the 1 a.m. sandwich, that costs $8, and plunged into the large saba roll with citrus braised pork, ham, swiss cheese, cucumbers, cilantro and stone mustard aioli. The sandwich is loaded with flavor, tender pork and the crunch of cucumber.

But if you want to order the total package, I recommend the BART, which is technically not on the menu. It’s a combination of the Desi and the 1 a.m. sandwiches. It’s named after Bart, a pastor who orders the combination of two sandwiches during his weekly visit to the restaurant. Each bite has a hefty amount of pork and ham with pickled jalapenos and banana peppers that are tamed by cucumbers and carmelized onions.
Quench your thirst with a bottle of pop, beer or cider and then let the owner tell you about his world travels.
I recommend maduros, ripened sweet black plantains, as a side if you have a large appetite. The staff is friendly and helpful.

Open for lunch and dinner everyday except Mondays.

Paseo’s is set to reopen soon with a new owner, but I say forget about it and embrace Bongos. Compare them and tell me your favorite.
Bongos on Urbanspoon

Cheers

Christine

 

Dump the old spices and start fresh

Replenish your spices and seasonings

Cocoa for baking had expired four years ago. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Cocoa for baking had expired four years ago. Photo by Christine Willmsen

I have something embarrassing to admit. Although I think I’m not alone in this cooking faux pas, I must confess I have old spices in my cupboards. Now you might think they are a couple of months expired, but I’m ashamed to admit some of them are several years old. My baking cocoa was four years old – yikes. I found another half dozen items that had to go. Some dried and whole spices have a short shelf life while others can last up to three years. Although you won’t get ill by eating expired spices and herbs, they will lose their flavor profile, aroma and intensity. Now it’s time to for us all to purge those expired spices and replenish our seasonings and spices.

Check out the bulk section, there’s a pay off

I threw all of these spices away because they had expired years ago. Buy smaller amounts in the bulk section. Photo by Christine Willmsen

I threw all of these spices away because they had expired years ago. Buy smaller amounts in the bulk section. Photo by Christine Willmsen

As a single person, I often don’t finish spices in large containers before their expiration dates. I’m sold on the bulk section of grocery stores to buy smaller and fresher quantities. For spices you rarely use or need for a specific recipe, turn to the bulk section. You will save money when you buy two or three tablespoons of a spice like caraway seed, cardamom and turmeric in the bulk section, compared to a large container of it.

But be careful, when I was at my local QFC store, I found almost all of the bulk spices had already expired in their large tubs. That means that they’ve been sitting on the shelf for a long time.

Write the purchase date on your bags and jars of spices.  This will help you track how old they are. Store spices in a cool, dark area of your kitchen. Rub a spice between your fingers and taste it. Time to toss it in the compost not the saucepan, if it lacks an intense flavor kick.

Cheers

Christine

Conquering my Fears by Grilling Cornish Game Hen

A Recipe for Breaking my Fear of Fowl

Challenge yourself by grilling Cornish game hen. You'll discover just how easy it is to cook. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Challenge yourself by grilling Cornish game hen. You’ll discover just how easy it is to cook. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Most of us have foods we hate or food phobias. My friend Shannon can’t stand olives, and Patty believes beets taste like dirt. Mine has not been a hate of fowl, just a fear of it – fear of getting sick by eating undercooked poultry. What are your food fears?

Childhood memories can taint our palate

Let’s step back about 35 years to me as a child. My family had the philosophy of we eat what we cook, no arguments. I would whine, fight and hide my shriveled peas and the over-cooked, fatty, cheap steak that tasted like rawhide.

This cornish hen is the perfect size for dinner and leftovers. Photo By Christine Willmsen

This Cornish hen is the perfect size for dinner and leftovers. Photo By Christine Willmsen

Summer in Iowa meant juicy tomatoes, corn on the cob and grilled lemon chicken. When served a chicken breast and a leg, I took a big bite and discovered veins, tendons, bones and very pink meat. I complained to my parents that the chicken was raw and that I would get sick. My parents had no compassion, saying I had to finish eating the chicken, including all the meat near the bones. I don’t recall if I ever got sick, but since then I’ve had a fear of plunging my teeth into a piece of fowl.

In fact for years I couldn’t eat any meat on a bone, fearing the meat was raw and I would get sick. No BBQ ribs and no chicken wings. Boyfriends would cut the meat off the bone for me, and other times I would order boneless poultry. I was unable to cook a full-size chicken, let alone pick it up with my bare hands and take a bite.

Cornish Game Hen for one or two people

Marinate the hen in olive oil, fig and lemon preserves and other ingredients. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Ingredients include the hen, olive oil, fig, parsley, bourbon, cloves and lemon preserves. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Now it’s time to break my food phobia by getting to know the bird on a raw level and making my own recipe.

I bought a Cornish game hen, a small bony fowl that’s a perfect dinner for one or two people. I cut it in half, right down the breastbone, flattening it a bit with my hands, hearing the bones crunch. I marinated the two halves in a combination of fig and lemon preserves, parsley, cloves and other spices.

I can finally say I broke my fear of cooking small fowl and eating it. But you still won’t catch me gnawing on chicken wings. I hope this helps you take risks with food.

Hot in the Kitchen: Grilled Lemon and Fig Hen

 

Marinated the two halves of the hen for two hours in a mix of oil, fig preserves, parsley, lemon juice and preserves and cloves. Photo By Christine Willmsen

Marinate the two halves of the hen for at least two hours. Photo By Christine Willmsen

Ingredients:

1 Cornish game hen

¼ cup olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon to season grill

For side vegetables, add a sweet potato and half onion to the grill while cooking the hen. Photo by Christine Willmsen

For side vegetables, add a sweet potato and half onion to the grill.

¼ cup fig preserves

¼ cup chopped parsley

3 tablespoons bourbon

2 tablespoons lemon juice

4 slices of preserved lemons chopped

½ teaspoons ground clove

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon pepper

Cut the hen in half, rinse with water, pat dry and flatten with hand. Mix all the remaining ingredients together and then marinate the two halves for at least two hours. On a two-burner grill, heat to medium or 400 degrees and set the other burner on low. If using a charcoal grill, put coals on one side of the grill to create the same effect. Coat the grate with olive oil. Cook skin side down for 6 minutes on medium, then move it to the low temperature area of grill for 8 minutes. Flip the two pieces and cook on medium for 6 minutes and then 8 minutes on low. Total cooking time should be about 28 minutes. The internal temperature on the thigh should be 165 degrees and juices should be clear. Let the hen rest for several minutes before taking a bite.

Cheers to conquering our food fears

Christine

Hot Bourbon Vanilla Spiced Cocktail Recipe

Warm up with a Hot Bourbon Milk Cocktail

With more cold and rainy nights ahead, I thought what better way to warm the heart and soul than with a hot toddy.

As a child I recall when my mom would serve me warm milk before bedtime. The warm milk relaxed my body, and my eyes became heavy.  So I’ve created the adult version of this drink with some spices and a little kick. Try my warm cocktail that tastes just as comforting as when you were a young child. This is the perfect hot toddy after a day of skiing or outdoor hiking.

Combine all ingredients including bourbon, vanilla, anise, milk, maple syrup and cardamon. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Combine all ingredients including bourbon, vanilla, anise, milk, maple syrup and cardamon. Photo by Christine Willmsen

I concocted this recipe using a sample of Lagrima vanilla, made in Seattle by Neil and Rebekah Beam. They get single-source organic vanilla beans from places like Uganda and use vodka, bourbon and rum for their extracts.

Hot in the Kitchen – Hot Bourbon Spiced Milk

Ingredients:

Strain cocktail through a fine sieve. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Strain cocktail through a fine sieve. Photo by Christine Willmsen

½ cup whole milk

1 shot bourbon

1 teaspoon Lagrima vanilla (bourbon extract)

1 tablespoon maple syrup

2 star anise pods

½ teaspoon ground cardamom

1 cinnamon stick (optional)

Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan and cook over medium-low heat for five minutes, occasionally stirring it. Remove from heat, and pour mixture through a small, fine mesh sieve or colander and serve in a brandy glass or coffee mug with a cinnamon stick.

Cheers

Christine

Joule Restaurant offers modern Korean cuisine

The persimmon salad is full of surprises as a starter. Photo by Christine Willmsen

The persimmon salad with bitter green and sesame yogurt is full of surprises as a starter. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Joule Restaurant is Asian fusion at its best

Cold-smoked tofu with Asian mushrooms is a star on the menu. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Cold-smoked tofu with Asian mushrooms is a star on the menu. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Don’t take my word for it – okay do – but just look at how packed Joule restaurant is every night and you’ll know why I keep coming back to this fantastic fusion restaurant that is my new Solo Hot Spot.

This unique restaurant shares space with The Whale Wins at 3506 Stone Way N., Seattle. As you walk through the front door the hallway literally separates the two chic restaurants. To the left you will find Joule encased with windows. The menu is diverse, with an emphasis on beef.

Top dishes to try

My favorite two dishes are the cold-smoked tofu made in-house and the duck pastrami with rice. The $9 tofu is silky, firm and smoky and the Hon-shimeji mushrooms add a nuttiness and earthiness to the soy vinaigrette.

Watch cooks by sitting at the chef counter. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Watch cooks by sitting at the chef counter. Photo by Christine Willmsen

The $14 duck pastrami satiates the tummy with fried rice and pickled currant. The Seattle Times’ review states the kalbi-marinated steak is a must-order.

Sally up to the chef counter, where there’s no reservations needed and is a perfect perch for a single person. Or if you are feeling social, try the communal table. The closer I am to seeing the food prepared and watching the talented chefs the happier I am as a diner at a restaurant. There’s something about watching chefs like owner Rachel Yang work their craft that totally relaxes me. In this case I’m mesmerized by this open kitchen because the staff executes each dish flawlessly and effortlessly. The team functions like a well-oiled machine, quietly humming as they cook dish after dish with ease.

Duck Pastrami with fried rice is decadent, comfort food. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Duck Pastrami with fried rice is decadent, comfort food. Photo by Christine Willmsen

At the counter you don’t feel alone and often you can spark up a conversation with the chefs or others sitting there. Yang and her husband Chef Seif Chirchi also own Revel restaurant, in the Fremont neighborhood and plan to open a third restaurant in Capitol Hill.

Cheers

Christine

Joule on Urbanspoon

Sweet Superbowl Party Peanuts

Rose Candied Peanuts

Of course the Superbowl is about football, but let’s not forget the party food. Whether you are attending another person’s party or crashing on the couch to watch the game Sunday, you must make my addicting Rose Candied Peanuts.

With just four ingredients this is an easy, aromatic snack to make that can be nibbled on while the Seahawks beat the Broncos or added to your lunch bag. This healthy, sweet combination takes only a couple of minutes to make and is easy to transport to a party.

Sprinkling rose water on the peanuts gives them a sweet, floral aroma unlike anything you’ve smelled before.

A bottle of rose water can be purchased at most Asian food stores and other gourmet markets for $5-10. I used roasted peanuts, but try almonds too. The candied peanuts can be stored for about one week if they stay out of your hands that long.

Hot in the Kitchen

Ingredients

3/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup water

1 3/4 cup roasted peanuts or almonds

1 1/2 teaspoons rose water

Dissolve sugar in water and bring to boil in small saucepan. Combine the water, sugar and peanuts in a saute or frying pan. Cook on medium high heat, stirring often until the syrup evaporates. Sprinkle rose water on nuts, stir and let cool.

Cheers

Christine

Recipe for Kale and Leek Pancakes

Kale and leek pancakes make a perfect lunch or dinner. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Kale and leek pancakes make a perfect lunch or dinner. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Ways to cook Kale: pancakes

The tumeric topping on the kale pancakes adds depth. Photo by Christine Willmsen

The tumeric topping on the kale pancakes adds depth. Photo by Christine Willmsen

Kale is the IN food when it comes to cooking. So I created two recipes to urge you to buy a bunch of kale and try the bold, deep, green vegetable that most people set aside because it’s used mostly as a garnish. This recipe combines kale and leeks to create a pancake for brunch, lunch or dinner.

Another way to use the rest of your kale bunch is to make a breakfast kale smoothie that is full of Vitamin A, C and K. If you are adventuresome in the dirt, plant kale in your garden. It can grow in the Pacific Northwest during the fall and winter months and is also available at grocery stores. I used the kale and leeks from Oxbow Organic Farm, a 25-acre vegetable garden near Carnation that sells its produce at farmers markets, restaurants and to weekly subscribers.

Hot in the Kitchen – Kale and Leek Pancakes

Finely chop kale

Finely chop kale

Ingredients for Pancake:

1 cup finely chopped kale (dinosaur is best variety with center vein removed)

¼ cup chopped leeks

3 eggs

Combine ingredients for batter

Combine ingredients for batter

1 tablespoon water

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon pepper

¼ cup shredded mozzarella cheese

¼ cup peanut oil

Tumeric adds flavor

Turmeric adds flavor

Topping:

1 tablespoon low-fat sour cream

1 tablespoon low-fat yogurt

1/8 teaspoon turmeric

Dash of salt

Fry two minutes per side

Fry two minutes per side

Mix kale, leeks, eggs, water, salt, pepper and cheese together in bowl. In a frying pan, heat peanut oil on medium high until pan is hot. Use a half cup measuring tool to gently drop the mixture into the oil. Cook for two minutes on medium high until brown, using a splatter guard if grease starts to jump. Flip and cook another two minutes. Place on paper towel and drop the rest of the batter into the pan and repeat. Mix sour cream, yogurt, turmeric and dash of salt together and add dollop to the top of the pancakes.

Cheers

Christine

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